Love Lives Here

From infomekka.com

Love Lives Here has been described by the "Whitefish Pilot" as "a pro-tolerance group that is an affiliate of the Montana Human Rights Network".[2] It was co-founded by Rabbi Allen Secher and his wife. Allen was arrested once in 1962 and again in 1964 for demonstrating with the Freedom Riders.[3] The Jewish news site forward.com has characterised the area around Whitefish, Montana, a small city where Love Lives Here is active, as "a sort of Jewish hub" in a state that is "among the whitest states in the country".[4] According to its website, Love Lives Here is headquartered in Kalispell and is also active in Whitefish, Columbia Falls "and the surrounding areas within the Flathead Valley", supporting "Campaign Against Violence, LGBT, Human Rights, and discrimination issues".[5]

Love Lives Here held a rally in 2014 against the alt Right movement's Richard Spencer.[1] According to "Forward", it campaigned to have Whitefish bar Richard "from conducting business in town, but ultimately settled for a city resolution condemning hate groups".[4] Andrew Anglin of "Daily Stormer" had scheduled a march in Whitefish for 16 January 2017 in support of Richard and his mother, but it was postponed and so far has not occurred.[6] Sherry Spencer has been urged by "a local realtor who is Jewish and loosely affiliated with Love Lives Here" to sell a building she owns in downtown Whitefish "and denounce her son's white nationalism".[4]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Osita Nwanevu (19 December 2016). "Neo-Nazi Website Calls for 'Action' Against Jews in Richard Spencer's Hometown". slate.com. Retrieved 26 December 2016.
  2. Heidi Desch (2 December 2014). "COUNCIL TAKES STAND IN SUPPORT OF DIVERSITY". whitefishpilot.com. Retrieved 26 December 2016.
  3. Eitan Arom (23 December 2016). "Montana rabbi speaks out on anti-Semitic harassment". jewishjournal.com. Retrieved 26 December 2016.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Sam Kestenbaum (15 December 2016). "In Montana, Activists and a Rabbi Resist the Resident White Supremacist". forward.com. Retrieved 7 January 2017.
  5. "Welcome". loveliveshereflathead.org. Retrieved 7 January 2017.
  6. Dillon Tabish (11 January 2017). "Neo-Nazi Website Postpones Armed March in Whitefish". flatheadbeacon.com. Retrieved 15 January 2017.